in which I attempt to be a rockstar teacher librarian :)

Posts tagged ‘grad school’

LIS student Day In The Life #2

It’s Tuesday. And day two of this project. Twosday?

It’s been said that I occasionally have “intense” hair. Well, I’d like to think it’s just a natural overflow of my intensely bubbly and helpful personality! Science tells me it’s probably just a combination of genetics and humidity, though.

Must. drink. more. coffee.(Note, the Timmy Ho Twenty Fo makes another appearance!)

Must. drink. more. coffee.
(Note, the Timmy Ho Twenty Fo makes another appearance!)

Today, I am, among other things…

  • trying to learn useful ‘tricks of the trade’ regarding GoogleSites, and how to build, curate, and manage them. Why is this harder than normal, you ask? Because my host school’s filtering policy blocks Google Help. Yep. So this project will continue tomorrow, when I’m at home and unfiltered!
  • helping out my host librarian and/or students with anything that comes up during the day. The fun part of being a librarian is something happens almost every day that must be handled almost immediately! To me, that’s fun. 🙂

Stay tuned! You never know what will happen as the day goes on…

And now it’s late afternoon and I can report that…

I found some rather entertaining infographics this afternoon. My host librarian asked for some, so, I went out in search and it was really quite fruitful. I decided to share this Anatomy of a Librarian one with y’all.

But unrelatedly, “The Very Very Many Varieties of Beer” was even more fascinating.

I’ve got assignments, modules to read, and food(s) to make tonight. See you on the twitters! 🙂

Some Honest Thoughts: Post-Elem Practicum!

I still can’t believe this was my last week at my elementary practicum. Wow, how time flies when you’re incredibly busy, and we were. I’m incredibly grateful for the experience! A few things I’d like to note:

  1. My teaching skills have come a LONG way in a short time. I grew to feel really comfortable in front of the room and speaking with the students while instructing them. I recommend everyone try to teach a “pretty full” week, or if you can’t do that, teach an entire day (5 or 6 classes, different grade levels). The constant need to adapt, redirect, change, etc., will really help you in terms of gaining confidence teaching. (Not saying it isn’t difficult…but it’s well worth it!)
  2.  As almost a necessary result, my behavior management skills improved exponentially over just a week. At one point I wrote in my notes, “Don’t be afraid to STOP and REDIRECT”. It can be frustrating when you think “I need to teach X and Y, we need to do activity Z, and they’ve got to find new books in 35 minutes”. But, when behavioral issues mean the entire class is distracted, it’s okay to stop, redirect, refocus, and come back to the lesson, even if it eats into the time. Otherwise, you’re simply continuing the lesson so you can feel successful, when really it’s more about making sure your students are successful at the end — even if it’s not quite up to what your expectations were when you were planning. That was a lesson I needed to learn, but I learned it quickly!
  3. My experience after school with the Tech Club really helped me gain an understanding of my students, because I saw them three times a week- twice in tech afterschool, once during the school day. Because I’m not a “digital native” and can actually be a bit of a Luddite, it was great for me to see how ten year olds approach digital work, creation, production, and just general computer skills.There’s a huge difference, for the record, between students who may be in the same grade but have vastly different skill sets and experience with tech. While I was at the school, we learned/reviewed/made projects/created using Wordle/Tagxedo, Animoto, and Make Belief Comix, and I did a tutorial on how to create using Prezi. This week we started discussing Popplet as a mind-mapping tool but also a presentation tool.

By the time I left today, with 129.5 hours under my belt, I felt really good about how this whole rapid-paced experience went. Considering I went into (school name) feeling like the elementary level was going to be incredibly difficult and “out of my comfort zone”, I emerged feeling like I could really make a difference working with the younger students in our school system. That’s probably the best feeling one can have after student teaching…. right?

Year 2, Day 1: Quick Reflections of a Library School Schmedian.

Dear goodness. This day came upon me way too quickly. Or perhaps quickly enough. Either way… I can’t believe it. Starting year 2 of grad school. A year from now I’ll be… well, hopefully I’ll be, although where or doing what remains to be seen.

A few quick thoughts, because I don’t have time for a proper reflection (shame, shame):

  • This year will be harder and more labor-intensive than last year. Oh gracious… I’ll try not to think about that. But in addition to 5 more classes, I have 50h of elementary fieldwork, 240h of practicum, and a bevy of tests and training sessions and other required hoopla for certification.
  • We students often talk about our ‘learning style’, and then there is the ongoing, never settled debate of “how do you prefer to learn?” when it comes to on-campus/online styles. Myself, I’ve come to prefer online if a flipped classroom approach can be successfully integrated and used. It’s not always possible or likely. At this point, however, I have no choice, as my remaining classes (save one) are offered only in an online format. It made me wonder – what do our professors prefer? Some of them, without doubt, aren’t given a choice either… hmm.
  • I think there must be a mathematical equation for determining stress in grad school. It goes something like…
    Start with number of classes. Multiply by number of projectsMultiply by number of group projects (because they count extra). Multiply by number of group members, total. Stare at total. Gape at total. 
    Divide by number of weeks in a semester. Stare at total. Gape at total. Realize that work is never spaced evenly throughout the semester. Continue staring and gaping. Close eyes, breathe deeply, #facepalm. Open eyes, multiply by Planck’s constant to prove your brain is intact, ignore total. Close eyes again, breathe deeply, and get your calendar and multicolored pens out…
  • I may or may not have already completed the above assignment. On the first day of classes. Yes, that’s a sign of something…

Good luck, fellow library school-ers and fellow schmedians. Carry on, keep the faith, and remember that December isn’t TOO far away. If that sounds too stressful, remember – the Mayans said it’s all over in 2012, so go out with your bells on and projects done!