in which I attempt to be a rockstar teacher librarian :)

Posts tagged ‘social networking’

Intellectual Freedom & Online Safety

From “Minors and Internet Interactivity: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights” – ALA

“Prohibiting children and young adults from using social networking sites does not teach safe behavior and leaves youth without the necessary knowledge and skills to protect their privacy or engage in responsible speech.  Instead of restricting or denying access to the Internet, librarians and teachers should educate minors to participate responsibly, ethically, and safely.”

This statement, I feel, was the clearest and most undramatic that emerged from this week’s IST 611 readings. I particularly appreciate the effort ALA makes to ensure that their guidelines and suggestions apply to librarians and teachers while preserving the right of parents to make the best choice for their child.

One of the questions posed to use this week is:
How important should / will the teacher-librarian be in providing the additional educational component required of CIPA?

The educational component referred to is as such, “The Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act directs E-rate applicants to also certify that their CIPA-required Internet safety policies provide for the education of students regarding appropriate online behavior including interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and regarding cyberbullying awareness and response.” More information on this revision is available via the Federal Communication Commission 11-125 Report.

What do I conclude based on the above two readings (and numerous others which I shan’t direct you to)? Not only should we be educating our students, as school librarians, in how to act and conduct ourselves on social media, social networks, chat rooms, and other corners of the wide Internet space, but we must do so.

Classroom teachers are often strapped to get through the curriculum within the school year. The additional burden of the Common Core standards implementation is time-consuming and most likely to be a long process for many teachers. In the meantime, and continuing through, we have an opportunity to teach students (as demanded above) in conjunction with our belief in intellectual freedom, our knowledge of information fluency skills and societal demands upon today’s students, and the immediacy with which we must approach our students and begin teaching not only appropriate behavior, but appropriate and useful applications.

What do you think? Do we have time in our school day to accomplish this? Will we be supported if we do? I, personally, think we’re in a great position to take on this role – assuming we find the time to do so.

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A Few Thoughts On: Digital Footprints

We all know digital footprints exist. We all have one. Whether you’re reading this blog from your phone, or from a public access computer in a library, you have a digital footprint. That’s not the question.

Here’s the question:
what image does your digital footprint create of you? Think of each link, image, post, etc., that’s linked to your name… does it make an accurate representation of you? Does it disguise who you really are? If you want people to find certain things — are they? If you don’t want people to find certain things — do they?

So often the focus of discussions on digital footprint focuses on, hide the bad stuff, highlight the good stuff, and hope it all ends up seemingly neutral! Excuse me for a moment, but… how absolutely ridiculous. The internet doesn’t care if you look good, bad, ugly, or neutral. How you appear is partly your responsibility… and partly the work of search engine optimization and different search terms.

I’m teaching a few classes this week on digital citizenship, particularly in regards to creating and curating a digital footprint. Don’t let IT create YOU. Our focus is going to be on ways that we can creative a positive footprint. What do I mean by that? I mean, leaving imprints in places we want to be imprinted.

Create a blog. Share your work with an audience outside your classmates. Share your photography on Flickr, and learn about different licensing agreements and how you can share (or not share!) and remix (or not remix)! Set up a GoogleSite for yourself, or build a portfolio. The list goes on. And so there’s a sneak peek into my week!